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New Cross Property Guide: Telegraph Hill Roads

 
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Arbuthnot Road

Erlanger Road

Jerningham Road

History: From 1875-1900 the Haberdashers' Company laid out Hatcham Manor Estate more info
Map
          
Buses: 21, 36, 53, 171, 172, 343, 436, 453
Rail: New Cross Gate
London Overground: New Cross Gate
Shops: New Cross Road

Late Victorian style. Road on Hatcham Manor Estate. Named in 1878, possibly after Dr John Arbuthnott (1667-1735), physician to Queen Anne. He was also a political satirist who created the character of John Bull and was immortalised by his friendship with Pope, Swift and Gay.

Overlooks Telegraph Hill Park. Late Victorian style, part of Hatcham Manor Estate development. Late Victorian style, named in 1878  and completed in  c.1880s

 

 

Late Victorian style, part of Hatcham Manor Estate development. Named in 1878, possibly after Edward Jerningham (1721-1812) a minor poet. Early photo

In the 1840s Robert Browning lived near Jerningham Road.

       

Kitto Road

Pepys Road

Waller Road

Troutbeck Road

Overlooks Telegraph Hill Park

Name approved in 1878, possibly after John Kitto (1804-1854) a religious writer.

 


Map
Overlooks Telegraph Hill Park. Late Victorian style, part of Hatcham Manor Estate development. Named in c. 1874, probably after Thomas Pepys who leased the manor in the late 17th Century. His brother, Samuel, visited Deptford as Secretary for the Navy. Early photo

Late Victorian style, part of Hatcham Manor Estate Development.
Built in c. 1870s and possibly named after Edmund Waller (1606-1687), a poet.

Map
Road off New Cross Road. Named in 1878 possibly after a town in Cumbria. The houses are early Edwardian.

       

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